Tag Archives: clinical trials

Top 10 Cardiology Articles of the week

Top 10 Cardiology Articles of the week  (24.11.14 – 30.11.14)

1. Transcatheter Closure of Large Atrial Septal Defects: Feasibility and Safety in a Large Adult and Pediatric Population

Conclusions—Closure of large atrial septal defects using the Amplatzer device is safe and effective in both adults and children. Superior and posterior rim deficiencies are associated with procedural failure. Closure can be performed under transthoracic  echocardiographic guidance in experienced centers. Early device migration is rare and can be safely managed by device extraction.  Long-term follow-up showed no deaths or major late complications in  311 patients.

2. Stent Coverage and Neointimal Proliferation in Bare Metal Stents Postdilated With a Paclitaxel-Eluting Balloon Versus Everolimus-Eluting Stents: Prospective Randomized Study Using Optical Coherence Tomography at 6-Month Follow-Up

Conclusions—Good stent strut coverage of >94% was found in both therapy groups. Despite greater suppression of global neointimal growth in DES, both DES and BMS+DEB effectively prevented clinically relevant focal restenosis at 6-month follow-up.

3. Multicenter Evaluation of a Next-Generation Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve
Conclusions – This third-generation device addresses major deficiencies of earlier valves in terms of ease of use, accuracy of positioning, and paravalvular sealing. The rates of mortality and stroke with transfemoral access are among the lowest reported and support further evaluation as an alternative to open surgery in intermediate-risk patients.
(Safety and Performance Study of the Edwards SAPIEN 3 Transcatheter Heart Valve [SAPIEN3]; NCT01808287)

4. 2014 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

5. Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Closure: Procedural Techniques and Outcomes

6. Atenolol versus Losartan in Children and Young Adults with Marfan’s Syndrome

Conclusion – Among children and young adults with Marfan’s syndrome who were randomly assigned to losartan or atenolol, no significant difference was found in the rate of aortic-root dilatation between the two treatment groups over a 3-year period.

7. Inactivating Mutations in NPC1L1 and Protection from Coronary Heart Disease

Conclusion – Naturally occurring mutations that disrupt NPC1L1 function were found to be associated with reduced plasma LDL cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease.

8. MagnaSafe: MRI safe for patients with pacemakers, ICDs

9. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

10. Long-term Clinical and Angiographic Outcomes of the Mini-STAR Technique as a Bailout Strategy for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Chronic Total Occlusion

Top 10 Cardiology articles of the week

Top 10 Cardiology articles of the week (10.11.14-16.11.14)

Hello friends , I have been busy for sometime. Now journal scan is back again after a brief interruption. I have chosen articles on general cardiology and interventional cardiology

1. The optimal management of anti-thrombotic therapy after valve replacement:                          certainties and uncertainties

2. Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease without Clinical Heart Failure

3. The Unnatural History of Tetralogy of Fallot: Prospective Follow-Up of 40 Years After Surgical Correction

4. Clinical Outcomes and Improved Survival in Patients With Protein-Losing Enteropathy After the Fontan Operation

5. Immediate and midterm outcomes following primary PCI with bioresorbable vascular   scaffold implantation in patients with ST-segment myocardial
infarction: insights from the multicentre “Registro ABSORB Italiano” (RAI registry)

 

6. Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation Followed by 6- Versus 12-Month Dual Antiplatelet Therapy. The SECURITY Randomized Clinical Trial

7. Short- and Long-Term Cause of Death in Patients Treated With Primary PCI for STEMI

 

8. The QT Interval Is Associated With Incident Cardiovascular Events

9. Endovascular Treatment of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysms: A European Multicenter Study

10.Intracoronary Delivery of Injectable Bioabsorbable Scaffold (IK-5001) to Treat Left Ventricular Remodeling After ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction. A First-in-Man Study

PARADIGM-HF Trial

A new class of drug (Neprilysin inhibitor ) when combined with angiotensin receptor blocker , has been shown to be better than Enalapril.

Angiotensin–Neprilysin Inhibition versus Enalapril in Heart Failure — NEJM.

Extended-Release Niacin with Laropiprant

HPS2-THRIVE trial

Among patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease, the addition of extended-release niacin–laropiprant to statin-based LDL cholesterol–lowering therapy did not significantly reduce the risk of major vascular events but did increase the risk of serious adverse events.  

Effects of Extended-Release Niacin with Laropiprant in High-Risk Patients — NEJM.

APPOSITION IV : Trial

STENTYS SELF APPOSITION SES:

It is a self-expandable sirolimus-eluting coronary stent system, similar in concept to other self-expanding systems.

Watch the video:

Stentys self-apposition SES

APPOSITION IV trial:

Patients – 152 patients presenting with STEMI.

Design: Patients were randomized to Stentys self-apposing SES (Stentys, Paris, France; n = 90)   vs Resolute zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES; Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA; n = 62). Each treatment arm was then randomized to either 4- or 9-month follow-up.

 -Results: On QCA, no differences were observed between the treatment arms just after the procedure for in-stent minimal and mean lumen diameter. In-stent mean lumen diameter was larger at both 4- and 9-month follow-up for Stentys compared with Resolute (3.39 ± 0.46 mm vs 3.13 ± 0.35 mm).

-OCT demonstrated that Stentys SES was associated with fewer malapposed struts (0.07 ± 0.26% vs 1.16 ± 1.59%) and more covered struts (94.32 ± 5.69% vs 89.09± 5.65%) than Resolute ZES at 4 months. Percentage of stents with all struts covered was also higher with Stentys compared to Resolute ZES (33.3% vs 3.8%).

-No differences in malapposition (P = .55) or coverage (P = .81) were seen between the treatment arms in the 9-month cohort.

-Clinical outcomes were low and well balanced between stent groups in terms of MACE (P = .46), TVF (P = .46), and target vessel MI (P = .39).

-Predilatation Needed.

-The device is larger in profile as compared to DES

 Conclusion: Stentys, a self-apposing sirolimus-eluting stent (SES), shows ‘excellent’ apposition over time—better than an existing balloon-expandable drug-eluting stent—in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The newer device is associated with faster strut coverage.

Your comments and insight most welcome

 

Antiplatelet Therapy for Stable CAD in AF Patients Taking an Oral Anticoagulant

Background—The optimal long-term antithrombotic treatment of patients with coexisting atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease is unresolved, and commonly, a single antiplatelet agent is added to oral anticoagulation. The study investigated the effectiveness and safety of adding antiplatelet therapy to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) in atrial fibrillation patients with stable coronary artery disease.

Methods and Results—Atrial fibrillation patients with stable coronary artery disease (defined as 12 months from an acute coronary event) between 2002 and 2011 were identified. The subsequent risk of cardiovascular events and serious bleeding events (those that required hospitalization) was examined with adjusted Cox regression models according to ongoing antithrombotic therapy. A total of 8700 patients were included (mean age, 74.2 years; 38% women). During a mean follow-up of 3.3 years, crude incidence rates were 7.2, 3.8, and 4.0 events per 100 person-years for myocardial infarction/coronary death, thromboembolism, and serious bleeding, respectively. Relative to VKA monotherapy, the risk of myocardial infarction/coronary death was similar for VKA plus aspirin (hazard ratio, 1.12 [95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.34]) and VKA plus clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.53 [95% confidence interval, 0.93–2.52]). The risk of thromboembolism was comparable in all regimens that included VKA, whereas the risk of bleeding increased when aspirin (hazard ratio, 1.50 [95% confidence interval, 1.23–1.82]) or clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.84 [95% confidence interval, 1.11–3.06]) was added to VKA.

Conclusions—In atrial fibrillation patients with stable coronary artery disease, the addition of antiplatelet therapy to VKA therapy is not associated with a reduction in risk of recurrent coronary events or thromboembolism, whereas risk of bleeding is increased significantly. The common practice of adding antiplatelet therapy to oral VKA anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease warrants reassessment.

Circulation.2014; 129: 1577-1585

MI rates with Ticagrelor (from PLATO)

This article in JACC examines the rates of MI in patients with ACS treated with ticagrelor vs clopidogrel.

The rates of overall MI at 12 months:

1. Ticagrelor- 5.8%

2. Clopidogrel – 6.9%

3. Nonprocedural MI (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.01) and MI related to percutaneous      coronary intervention or stent thrombosis tended to be lower with ticagrelor.

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